Highlighting the Romagna Wine Region With Poggio Della Dogana

Poggio Della Dogana Property


Growing up in the United States and Switzerland, Aldo and Paolo Rametta, two brothers, decided to return to Italy and celebrate their roots with a family project in Romagna. The goal was to elevate their passion for Romagna wine by creating Sangiovese di Romagna. In 2016, they established Poggio Della Dogana, and in 2020, they acquired Ronchi di Castelluccio.

The Italian region of Romagna lies in the southeastern portion of Emilia-Romagna in northern Italy. Its boundaries consist of the Apennines to the southwest, the Adriatic to the east, and the rivers Reno and Silaro to the north and west. The Conca River divides Romagna from Marche on the southeast.

The name Romagna is befitting as it means Land of the Romans.

Aldo and Paolo Rametta and the Team

They were born in New Orleans. Their careers were in renewable energy and finance. Their business acumen and entrepreneurial approach set the standard for this family project. They entered the wine business with the intention of creating a fresher version of Sangiovese.

Their wives also play a role in the family business. They are in charge of administration and communications. Winemaker Francesco Bordini oversees vineyard management and wine production.

Brothers Aldo and Paolo Rametta
Brothers Aldo and Paolo Rametta

Biodiversity and Sustainability

Biodiversity and sustainability are at the forefront of the Rametta brothers plans. The brothers envision an integrated agri-voltaic project to sustain the company’s energy supply. They feel this long-term sustainability project will grow and increase the value of the land and its assets.

Rochi Di Castelluccio and Poggio Della Dogana

Rochi Di Castelluccio resides in Modigliana. The property’s slopes were originally part of the Apennine Woods. An ancient tool called a “roncola” chopped them down. The soil composition consists of marine fossils, Marl, and sandstone.

The estate was founded in the 1970s by Gian Vittorio Baldi. With the assistance of enologist Vittorio Fiore and agronomist Remigio Bordini, the Rocnchi became the first Romagna crus. When the Rametta brothers purchased the property, they entrusted the agronomic and enological management to Francesco Bordini, Remigio’s son. Today, they restored the historic vines, utilizing them for their clonal selection and single vineyard expression.

Poggio Della Dogana is an estate with 20 hectares of vineyards over 20 years old. The vineyards are farmed organically and consist of Romangna’s most important grapes, Sangiovese, and the white grape Albana.

The vineyards lie in a hilly area between Castrocaro Terme and Brisighella. Nine of the Castrocaro Terme hectares have brown clay and ochre soils with rich elements of bromine, sulfur, and calcium. Breezes from the Adriatic come.

The other 11 hectares located in the Brisighella feature calcareous soils that enhance the wines with a saline character.

The estate also produces lime and Millefiori honey. Bees live between the rows of vines, adding to the biodiversity. Olive trees on the estate help with climate and organic cultivation.

Poggio Della Dogana Winery Porch
Poggio Della Dogana Winery Porch

Poggio Della Dogana Wine Labels

Showcasing Romagna, the Rametta brothers utilized sketches and studies of Silvio Gordini, one of Emilia-Romagna’s well-known artists and great-great-grandfather of Aldo and Paolo. The labels pay tribute to the family and the region.

Romagna Wine from Poggio della Dogana
Romagna Wine from Poggio della Dogana

Poggio Della Dogana Wines

Belladama:  This wine consists of 100% Albana, a grape primarily known to the Romagna region. It received DOCG status in 1987. The grape dates back to the Romans. The wine ages in cement tanks for nine months and displays a fruity character. With hints of citrus and herbs, it is very aromatic with a touch of salinity.

Belladama is the name of an Italian harness racehorse owned by the brother’s great-grandfather.

Belladama Albana
Belladama Albana

Santa Reparata Romagna Sangiovese Superiore Castrocaro: The wine ages 12 months in concrete vessels, followed by a minimum of three months in the bottle. I found a fruity, well-balanced wine with black and red fruit and hints of spice.

The wine is named after the Patron saint of Terra della Sole, a young woman martyred during the persecutions of the Roman Emperor Decius.

Santa Reparata Romagna Sangeiovese
Santa Reparata Romagna Sangeiovese

Artesiana Romagna Doc Sangiovese Brisighella: This Sangiovese represents the second cru from Poggio della Dogana. The wine exhibits red fruit and hints of black pepper. This Sangiovese ages 12 months in cement tanks followed by 12 months in bottle.

The wine is named after the broodmare of Aldo and Paolo’s maternal grandfather’s stable. She was docile but strong and proud, like the expression of the Sangiovese namesake.

Arlesiana Romagna Sangiovese
Arlesiana Romagna Sangiovese

Beldemonio Vermouth Rosso: It was a treat sampling this Vermouth because I did not expect to discover Vermouth made from Sangiovese—the Vermouth aged 12 months in barriques, followed by three months of herb and spice infusion aromatization. The infusion combines orange skins, clove, rosemary, sage, and thyme. I found the Vermouth sweet and savory with hints of black pepper. I thought of a savory potpourri.

Beldemonium was a track horse, one of the strongest in the brother’s grandfather’s stable. The floral design represents the rebirth of nature, symbolized by the meeting between Zephyrus and Chloris.

Beldemonio Vermouth Rosso
Beldemonio Vermouth Rosso

The Future Of Romagna Wine

For Aldo and Pablo, “wine is a conduit of life.” The brothers set a goal of spreading the word about the Romagna wine region and familiarizing those who love Italian wine with it.

Note: As is common in the wine industry, this writer received a hosted winetasting dinner. While it has not influenced this review, the writer believes in full disclosure.

0 Shares